Museum Information


Monday - Saturday 12:00 pm to 7:30 pm*
Sunday 12:00 pm to 6:00 pm*
Visitors should plan on arriving at least 45 minutes prior to closing

How to find us

The museum is located inside the Mall at Wellington Green, at Forest Hill Blvd and S. State Rd. 7 (441)
Best entrance is the food court on east side of the mall. 
The museum is in space 172 on the lower level 

                                                      January & February Events

The Palm Beach County Anthropological Society
Presents an On-line Lecture via Zoom
Thursday, January 27th, 6:30 pm



"Dining al fresco: A Zooarchaeological Examination of Food Remains at Boca Raton Inlet, Palm Beach County."

Guest Speaker

                                        Dr. April Watson
 
April Watson completed both her undergraduate degree and her Master’s degree in anthropology with a focus in archaeology. Watson’s undergraduate research centered on south Florida prehistoric mound sites, particularly looking at the use of ceramics and shell tools. Her graduate studies focused on the coast of Cuba, where she created a predictive model of prehistoric archaeological sites. This involved extensive use of geographic information systems tools, including ArcMap and remote sensing applications. She also conducted analysis of artifacts recovered from the Guantanamo Bay area, including pottery sherds and lithic artifacts. After graduating, Dr. Watson worked throughout the Southeastern United States in cultural resources management as a Staff Archaeologist for an environmental engineering firm.

Watson finished her graduate education with a PhD in Geosciences from Florida Atlantic University. She continued her experiences with mapping and landscape analysis as well as her focus on the relationship between humans and their environment. She utilized trend analysis to explore landscape usage, as well as explored economic trends via social network analysis. Throughout her graduate studies, she worked as a teaching assistant, then as an Adjunct Professor at Florida Atlantic University and Broward College. She currently serves as the secretary for the Florida Archaeological Council, and works in conjunction with federal agencies in the area of archaeological and historical preservation. Watson’s current research interest include prehistoric ceramics’ usage, landscape utilization by past and present peoples of the Southeastern United States, environmental sustainability, GIS based map inquires, and mathematical modeling of human/environmental spatial relationships.




The Archaeological Institute of America So FL Chapter
Presents 
Friday, February 11th, 8 pm



"Across the Ocean Blue: Evidence for Precolumbian
Voyages and Contacts."

Guest Speaker

                                        Dr. Alice Kehoe
 
The idea that Columbus discovered an unknown New World in 1492 was popularized in the nineteenth century as part of U. S. “Manifest Destiny” propaganda for taking over the American continent.  Indians were labeled “Savages” isolated from the rest of the world and incapable of great works.  Similarities between Old World and American crafts are still conventionally said to be independent inventions, and long ocean voyages impossible.  The Guinness Book of World Records shows that even a paddleboard has been sailed between American and Europe, twice.  This lecture shows varieties of boats capable of crossing oceans; obvious evidence that people crossed ocean straits more than 100,000 years ago in the South Pacific; archaeological evidence of movements around the Pacific in the Terminal Glacial Period; and archaeological evidence of transpacific contacts between Southeast Asia and Mesoamerica during the medieval spice trade about 1200 C.E.  Woodland ceramics in eastern North America are best explained by introduction across the North Atlantic from coastal Scandinavia, as hypothesized by Stuart Piggott (the archaeologist in the Sutton Hoo film “The Dig”).  DNA analyses now confirm interpretations formerly dismissed as “impossible”.

Alice Kehoe is professor emeritus, conducted field excavations in the Northwestern Plains/Canadian Prairie, in addition to extensive experience with First Nations in that area.  She has also participated in archaeology at Tiwanaku, Solutre, Dolni Vestonice, and other sites.  Broad and varied fieldwork and professional experiences stimulated her to research history of archaeology and also sociology of science regarding archaeology, background for a dozen books on American archaeology issues and First Nations ethnohistories.



Link to Zoom Meeting:
 https://us06web.zoom.us/j/86050843071?pwd=eGRaMENQa1JzajdpNFZTbUg2QVdjZz09
Meeting ID: 860 5084 3071, Passcode: 673957


                                                                       Featured Exhibits 

Expedition Ice Age

Expedition Ice Age: The Past Becomes Alive! Mammoths, Mastodons, Giant Sloths, and Saber-toothed Cats! Come see an amazing collection of real fossils and exquisite museum replicas.

Cheryll the Triceratops

Excavated by the Museum's paleontologists the majority
of Cheryll's bones are the real thing! Come see the only actual dinosaur skeleton available for viewing in southern Florida. 


                                                         On the National Geographic Channel


Robert DePalma and Dr. Phil Manning
National Geographic Channel

"Dino Death Match" and "Ultimate Dino Survivor"


"Dino Death Match"

Watch the latest episode of the National  Geographic Channel

With commentary by PBMNH Curator of Paleontology
Robert DePalma

Does the recently discovered and controversial "Dueling Dinosaurs" fossil provide proof of the validity of  Nanotyrannus as a species vs classification as a juvenile T. rex? Without a doubt according to Robert and his colleagues Dr. Robert Bakker of the Houston Museum of Natural History and Pete Larson of the Black Hills Institute.

Nanotyrannus is the rarest and most enigmatic of the Late Cretaceous tyrannosaurids. Its sleek build, smaller size, and powerful legs made it an exceptionally agile and lethal predator. "Tara" is one of only three of her kind yet discovered, and is  the only fully mounted skeleton of this fascinating dinosaur.

Check out some teaser information and gallery images on Nat Geo's website: http://natgeotv.com/in/ dino-death-match



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