Archaeological Institute of America – South FL Chapter

American Journal of Archaeology

One of the world’s most distinguished and widely distributed journals devoted to archaeology, the AJA has set the standard for archaeological scholarship since 1885.

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James M Adovasio: The First Floridians: Early Humans on the Submerged Gulf Coast of Florida

The First Floridians:
Early Humans on the Submerged Gulf Coast of Florida

Dr. James M. Adovasio
September 2012

Gretchen E Meyers: Weaving as Worship Reconstructing Ritual at the Etruscan Site of Poggio Colla (Vicchio)

Weaving as Worship
Reconstructing Ritual at the Etruscan Site of Poggio Colla (Vicchio)

Dr. Gretchen E. Meyers
February 2013

Michael Fuller: The Da Vinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

The Da Vinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

Dr. Michael Fuller
November 2013

Irene Lemos: Out of the Dark: Lefkandi in Euboea 1200 BC

Out of the Dark:
Lefkandi in Euboea 1200 BC

Dr. Irene Lemos
February 2014

Susanne Grieve: “To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”: Preservation of the Early Explorer’s Bases in the Ross Sea Region of Antarctica

“To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”: Preservation of the Early Explorer’s Bases in the Ross Sea Region of Antarctica

Susanne Grieve
April 2014

 the South Florida Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America

Welcome to the South Florida Chapter of the
Archaeological Institute of America

The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to the world of archaeology. The Institute is a nonprofit group founded in 1879 and chartered by the United States Congress in 1906. Today, the AIA has nearly 210,000 Members and more than 100 Local Societies in the United States, Canada, and overseas. AIA South Florida is one of four chapters in the state of Florida. Our members include professional archaeologists, corresponding members, students, and enthusiasts, all united by a shared passion for archaeology and its role in furthering human knowledge.

On the Trail of Phoenician Seafarers and Traders in Portugal



Dr. Shelley Wachsmann
Nautical archaeologist and Professor of Biblical Archaeology
Texas A&M University


Thursday, 7 PM, October 5, 2017
Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton Campus, Room GN 101

As they expanded across the Mediterranean, the Phoenicians continued to favor sites with specific natural features that that supplied protected anchorages for their ships. Phoenicians, apparently from Spanish enclaves in the Guadalaquivir area, created additional colonies and trading stations along the Atlantic coast of Africa and Europe. Notwithstanding literary claims to Phoenician north Atlantic seafaring, their northernmost archaeologically documented settlements are located in Portugal. In 2002 a joint expedition of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology and Portugal’s Centro Nacional de Arqueologia Náutica e Subaquática examined Phoenician maritime involvement at three Portuguese riverine sites—Santa Olaia, Abul and Castro Marim. Geoarchaeological and geophysical studies revealed evidence of significant geomorphic evolution of the surroundings of these sites, which masks the fact that these sites had been situated at the head of a bay or on the margins of estuaries, allowing the sites easy access to the sea, and immediate access to at least one natural anchorage.




Institute of America lecturer and host Shelley Wachsmann is the Meadows Professor of Biblical Archaeology at Texas A&M University, where he has been teaching courses in ancient seafaring and biblical archaeology since 1990. Born in Canada, Professor Wachsmann immigrated to Israel in 1968, where he earned all three of his degrees in Near Eastern Archaeology from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem’s Institute of Archaeology (Ph.D. 1990). From 1976 to 1989 he served as the Inspector of Underwater Antiquities for the Israel Department of Antiquities and Museums, during which time he was directly responsible for the nautical heritage of Israel. Professor Wachsmann is a Life Member of the Archaeological Institute of America, served as an AIA Academic Trustee (2011-13), and has been a member of the AIA Tours Committee since 2011. Since 1992, he has lectured almost annually on the AIA’s national lecture circuit. Professor Wachsmann has authored six books and over 100 articles on the results of his field research and on other archaeological subjects. Professor Wachsmann has carried out extensive fieldwork in the eastern Mediterranean. In one of his most recent projects (2003-06), he directed the Canadian team of a joint Canadian-Greek expedition in search of fleets lost during the Persian War in the early 5th century B.C. From 2007 to 2009 he annually led a deep-water survey studying the Crete-to-Egypt trade route in antiquity. Also since 2007, Professor Wachsmann has lectured to excellent reviews on six AIA-sponsored Mediterranean and Black Sea voyages.




If you would like to become a member of AIA South Florida, or just want to be notified about upcoming meetings, please send us an email through the Museum's Contact page. Not a member yet? Come join us for the 2017-18 lecture series as our guest, you are welcome!

   

   

Archaeology Magazine

Our award-winning popular magazine enters its seventh decade of publication committed to bringing the excitement of archaeological discovery to a popular audience.

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Steven R Holen: Early Humans in the Americas: When Did They Arrive and Where Did They Come From?

Early Humans in the Americas:
When Did They Arrive and
Where Did They Come From?

Dr. Steven R. Holen
October 2014

Peter Ferdinando: Atlantic Ais in the Later 17th Century: English Buccaneers, Spanish Silver, and Indigenous Divers from Florida

Atlantic Ais in the Later 17th Century: English Buccaneers, Spanish Silver, and Indigenous Divers from Florida

Peter Ferdinando
November 2014

Gwyn Davies: Endgame: The Siege of Masada From The Roman Perspective

Endgame: The Siege of Masada
From The Roman Perspective

Dr. Gwyn Davies
February 2015

The Dragons of Ancient Mexico

Dr. John Pohl
February 2016

Archaeology in Palestine:
New insights into Biblical Archaeology – a view from ancient Jericho

Dr. Lorenzo Nigro
April 2016

Rebooting Antiquity: How Holy Wars, Media Hype, and Digital Technologies are Changing the Face of 21st Century Archaeology

Dr. Neil Silberman
March 2017

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