Archaeological Institute of America – South FL Chapter

American Journal of Archaeology

One of the world’s most distinguished and widely distributed journals devoted to archaeology, the AJA has set the standard for archaeological scholarship since 1885.

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James M Adovasio: The First Floridians: Early Humans on the Submerged Gulf Coast of Florida

The First Floridians:
Early Humans on the Submerged Gulf Coast of Florida

Dr. James M. Adovasio
September 2012

Gretchen E Meyers: Weaving as Worship Reconstructing Ritual at the Etruscan Site of Poggio Colla (Vicchio)

Weaving as Worship
Reconstructing Ritual at the Etruscan Site of Poggio Colla (Vicchio)

Dr. Gretchen E. Meyers
February 2013

Michael Fuller: The Da Vinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

The Da Vinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

Dr. Michael Fuller
November 2013

Irene Lemos: Out of the Dark: Lefkandi in Euboea 1200 BC

Out of the Dark:
Lefkandi in Euboea 1200 BC

Dr. Irene Lemos
February 2014

Susanne Grieve: “To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”: Preservation of the Early Explorer’s Bases in the Ross Sea Region of Antarctica

“To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”: Preservation of the Early Explorer’s Bases in the Ross Sea Region of Antarctica

Susanne Grieve
April 2014

 the South Florida Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America

Welcome to the South Florida Chapter of the
Archaeological Institute of America

The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to the world of archaeology. The Institute is a nonprofit group founded in 1879 and chartered by the United States Congress in 1906. Today, the AIA has nearly 210,000 Members and more than 100 Local Societies in the United States, Canada, and overseas. AIA South Florida is one of four chapters in the state of Florida. Our members include professional archaeologists, corresponding members, students, and enthusiasts, all united by a shared passion for archaeology and its role in furthering human knowledge.

The Black Sea Maritime Archaeologial Project

Dr. Dr. Kroum N. Batchvarov
Associate Professor of Maritime Archaeology
University of Connecticut

Friday 7 PM, October 25, 2019
The Palm Beach Museum of Natural History
10300 Forest Hill Blvd., Suite 172, Wellington FL 33414

Since 2015 The Black Sea MAP, one of the largest maritime archaeological projects ever staged, has been investigating the changes in the ancient environment of the Black Sea region including the impact of sea level change during the last glacial cycle and interconnectivity through the millennia.

In the course of the Black Sea MAP’s surveys, more than sixty wrecks have been discovered and recorded with the latest robotic laser scanning, acoustic and photogrammetric techniques. The earliest wreck found so far is from the Classical period from around the 5th – 4th century BC. However, ships have also been found from the Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman periods spanning two and a half millennia.

They represent an unbroken pattern of trade and exchange, warfare and communication that reaches back into deep antiquity, and because of the anoxic conditions of the Black Sea, some of the wrecks survive in incredible condition. Ships lie hundreds or thousands of metres deep with their masts still standing, rudders in place, cargoes of amphorae and ship’s fittings lying on deck, with carvings and tool marks as distinct as the day they were made by the shipwrights. Many of the ships show structural features, fittings and equipment that are only known from iconography or written description but never seen until now.

This assemblage must comprise one of the finest underwater museums of ships and seafaring in the world.




Dr. Kroum Batchvarov is Associate Professor of Maritime Archaeology at the University of Connecticut, and holds his degrees from Park College and Texas A&M University (MA and PhD). He has a number of ongoing projects, including the Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project (as Co-Principal Investigator), the Rockley Bay Research Project in Tobago (as Project Director and Principal Investigator), and the Vasa project (analysis of construction and documentation of a 17th century Dutch-built man-of-war); he also served as Co-Principal Investigator for the Ropotamo inundated Chalcolithic settlement excavation (part of teh Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project). His publications include Domestic Economy aboard a Black Sea merchantman (in press), and A Method for Documenting Hidden Structures on Shipwrecks (in review). Professor Batchvarov is the AIA’s McCann/Taggart Lecturer for 2019/2020.




If you would like to become a member of AIA South Florida, or just want to be notified about upcoming meetings, please send us an email through the Museum's Contact page. Not a member yet? Come join us for the 2017-18 lecture series as our guest, you are welcome!

   

   

Archaeology Magazine

Our award-winning popular magazine enters its seventh decade of publication committed to bringing the excitement of archaeological discovery to a popular audience.

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Steven R Holen: Early Humans in the Americas: When Did They Arrive and Where Did They Come From?

Early Humans in the Americas:
When Did They Arrive and
Where Did They Come From?

Dr. Steven R. Holen
October 2014

Peter Ferdinando: Atlantic Ais in the Later 17th Century: English Buccaneers, Spanish Silver, and Indigenous Divers from Florida

Atlantic Ais in the Later 17th Century: English Buccaneers, Spanish Silver, and Indigenous Divers from Florida

Peter Ferdinando
November 2014

Gwyn Davies: Endgame: The Siege of Masada From The Roman Perspective

Endgame: The Siege of Masada
From The Roman Perspective

Dr. Gwyn Davies
February 2015

The Dragons of Ancient Mexico

Dr. John Pohl
February 2016

Archaeology in Palestine:
New insights into Biblical Archaeology – a view from ancient Jericho

Dr. Lorenzo Nigro
April 2016

Rebooting Antiquity: How Holy Wars, Media Hype, and Digital Technologies are Changing the Face of 21st Century Archaeology

Dr. Neil Silberman
March 2017

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