Archaeological Institute of America – South FL Chapter

American Journal of Archaeology

One of the world’s most distinguished and widely distributed journals devoted to archaeology, the AJA has set the standard for archaeological scholarship since 1885.

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James M Adovasio: The First Floridians: Early Humans on the Submerged Gulf Coast of Florida

The First Floridians:
Early Humans on the Submerged Gulf Coast of Florida

Dr. James M. Adovasio
September 2012

Gretchen E Meyers: Weaving as Worship Reconstructing Ritual at the Etruscan Site of Poggio Colla (Vicchio)

Weaving as Worship
Reconstructing Ritual at the Etruscan Site of Poggio Colla (Vicchio)

Dr. Gretchen E. Meyers
February 2013

Michael Fuller: The Da Vinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

The Da Vinci Code, Templars, and Archaeology

Dr. Michael Fuller
November 2013

Irene Lemos: Out of the Dark: Lefkandi in Euboea 1200 BC

Out of the Dark:
Lefkandi in Euboea 1200 BC

Dr. Irene Lemos
February 2014

Susanne Grieve: “To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”: Preservation of the Early Explorer’s Bases in the Ross Sea Region of Antarctica

“To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”: Preservation of the Early Explorer’s Bases in the Ross Sea Region of Antarctica

Susanne Grieve
April 2014

 the South Florida Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America

Welcome to the South Florida Chapter of the
Archaeological Institute of America

The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to the world of archaeology. The Institute is a nonprofit group founded in 1879 and chartered by the United States Congress in 1906. Today, the AIA has nearly 210,000 Members and more than 100 Local Societies in the United States, Canada, and overseas. AIA South Florida is one of four chapters in the state of Florida. Our members include professional archaeologists, corresponding members, students, and enthusiasts, all united by a shared passion for archaeology and its role in furthering human knowledge.

The Great Buffalo Jumps



Jack W. Brink
Curator of Archaeology, Royal Alberta Museum


Thursday, 7 PM, March 22, 2018
Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton Campus, Room GN 101

Buffalo Jumps were the most proficient and lucrative food-getting events ever devised by human beings. In a matter of moments, more food, bone and hide was obtained than by any other means in human history. This lecture explores the planning and execution of the great buffalo jumps by Plains Indians. The relevant behavior and biology of bison are discussed, along with people’s manipulation of these attributes to conduct successful kills. Massive kill sites of the Plains are illustrated and discussed, with a focus on the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Head-Smashed-In, Alberta, Canada. Buffalo Jumps embody the skill, danger, failures and successes of attempting to harvest great numbers of the largest land mammal in North America. The story of the great jumps is as inspiring as is the landscape in which the events unfolded.




John W. (Jack) Brink is the Curator of Archaeology with the Royal Alberta Museum. He has been active in Archaeology, heritage management and Native history for more than 40 years. He has conducted archaeological research in western Canada, the United States, the Canadian Arctic and China, and have published extensively on his work. His special areas of interest are the archaeology of the Northern Plains, especially bison hunting and Aboriginal rock art. He was a member of the team that planned and developed Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump, a UNESCO World Heritage site. He has also worked extensively at the rock art site of Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park, assisting with the development of a new Visitor Centre as well as conducting long-term research on methods of conserving rock art. He has worked extensively with Aboriginal groups, especially the Blackfoot Nation. As the Curator of Archaeology, he is  responsible for the management of the archaeological collections for the Province, for conducting relevant research, for initiating displays about Alberta archaeology, and for communicating with the public. Previously, as Head of the Archaeological Survey he managed an archaeological office that coordinated cultural resource for the province. He has a strong background in communicating to the general public on heritage matters, have delivered countless public talks, and have worked extensively with all media, including helping to develop, research, write and produce audio and video programs dealing with archaeology.




If you would like to become a member of AIA South Florida, or just want to be notified about upcoming meetings, please send us an email through the Museum's Contact page. Not a member yet? Come join us for the 2017-18 lecture series as our guest, you are welcome!

   

   

Archaeology Magazine

Our award-winning popular magazine enters its seventh decade of publication committed to bringing the excitement of archaeological discovery to a popular audience.

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Steven R Holen: Early Humans in the Americas: When Did They Arrive and Where Did They Come From?

Early Humans in the Americas:
When Did They Arrive and
Where Did They Come From?

Dr. Steven R. Holen
October 2014

Peter Ferdinando: Atlantic Ais in the Later 17th Century: English Buccaneers, Spanish Silver, and Indigenous Divers from Florida

Atlantic Ais in the Later 17th Century: English Buccaneers, Spanish Silver, and Indigenous Divers from Florida

Peter Ferdinando
November 2014

Gwyn Davies: Endgame: The Siege of Masada From The Roman Perspective

Endgame: The Siege of Masada
From The Roman Perspective

Dr. Gwyn Davies
February 2015

The Dragons of Ancient Mexico

Dr. John Pohl
February 2016

Archaeology in Palestine:
New insights into Biblical Archaeology – a view from ancient Jericho

Dr. Lorenzo Nigro
April 2016

Rebooting Antiquity: How Holy Wars, Media Hype, and Digital Technologies are Changing the Face of 21st Century Archaeology

Dr. Neil Silberman
March 2017

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